Trialling EBM

This research is investigating how to successfully put EBM into practice, using the Tasman and Golden Bays area as a case study. We are working with those who have marine management and/or governance responsibilities for the area to identify specific issues and co-design the project.

Project leader: Judi Hewitt, NIWA

Bringing it all together in Tasman and Golden Bays

This research is investigating how to successfully put EBM into practice, using the Tasman and Golden Bays area as a case study.

We are working with those who have marine management and/or governance responsibilities for the area to identify specific issues. For example, we are discussing issues with Tasman District Council, and we will work with the He Pou Tokomanawa project (see p28) to identify issues related to kaitiakitangi/ guardianship in the area.

These issues will be worked though using lessons, research and outputs provided by other projects within the Challenge. Where necessary, specific work needed to help resolve the issues will be identified and influence these other projects’ developments. This project will provide context and linkages between all of the Challenge’s projects.

By the end of the project, we hope to have identified the route needed to resolve issues, reinforced and/or developed the relationships and networks required to help, and undertaken some of the science required to underpin implementation of EBM.

This project will also identify gaps in the Challenge’s current research, which we will address in the future.

Identifying gaps in the knowledge and science means that councils, central government agencies, universities and Crown research institutes can address them through their research strategies.

Latest news and updates

Sustainable Seas features on Ocean Bounty S2 EP7

Sir Rob Fenwick,  our Chairman was interviewed about Sustainable Seas on S2 EP7 of Ocean Bounty. You can watch it here on TV 3 on demand.  (6.57 to 11.20).  

Consultation opens re 2019–2024 strategy

Improving marine management is critical to New Zealand's future health and wealth, but research in isolation is not enough. Excellent engagement with, and participation from, all users and sectors of society is essential.

We therefore invite comment on our draft strategy for Phase II (2019–2024). This strategy has been co-developed with Māori and stakeholders.

Sun, sea, sand – and marine science

During Seaweek, more than 4,600 school pupils joined 6 Sustainable Seas researchers for 3 days of marine science fieldwork in Tasman Bay, as part of the LEARNZ virtual field trip Sustainable seas – essential for New Zealand’s health and wealth.