Development of valuation frameworks and principles

The research team at Waikawa Marae near Picton in March 2017. Back row, from left: Kevin St Martin, Jim Sinner, Kai Chan, Nick Lewis, Marc Tadaki, Harvey Ruru, Bruce Glavović. Front row, from left: Charlotte Šunde, Janet Stephenson, Aneika Young, Annabelle Giorgetti, Shaun Awatere. Photo: Charlotte Šunde

We are identifying frameworks and principles that recognise the multiple values people hold for the marine environment, so that different perspectives can be included in ecosystem-based management (EBM) approach that is central to Sustainable Seas.

Project leader: Jim Sinner, Cawthron Institute

Including people’s values in decision making

Values are central to environmental decision-making, but there is no consensus about how they should be identified or assessed. A valuation framework is a way of organising information about things that matter to people, in this case to inform decision-making about New Zealand’s marine environment.

We are identifying frameworks and principles that recognise the multiple values people hold for the marine environment, so that different perspectives can be included in ecosystem-based management. The current system puts people in a binary situation – either accept or reject the proposal – rather than enabling exploration of alternatives.

We are examining how decision-making processes shape the way that values are expressed, documented and used, and identifying ways to improve these processes. To do this, we engaged with people who have been involved in decisions about management of Marlborough Sounds, through interviews, marae visits, a field trip and a workshop. We are now analysing our findings. Next, we will engage with decision-makers and their advisers.

We will use the information to generate draft principles for valuation. These will be tested and refined in a workshop, and again in the cross-challenge case study in Tasman and Golden Bays.

Latest news and updates

Consultation opens re 2019–2024 strategy

Improving marine management is critical to New Zealand's future health and wealth, but research in isolation is not enough. Excellent engagement with, and participation from, all users and sectors of society is essential.

We therefore invite comment on our draft strategy for Phase II (2019–2024). This strategy has been co-developed with Māori and stakeholders.

Sun, sea, sand – and marine science

During Seaweek, more than 4,600 school pupils joined 6 Sustainable Seas researchers for 3 days of marine science fieldwork in Tasman Bay, as part of the LEARNZ virtual field trip Sustainable seas – essential for New Zealand’s health and wealth.

Tipping Points on Radio NZ

Tune in to tonight’s episode of Our Changing World (after the 9pm news) for an excellent in-depth piece that gets into the detail of what the Tipping Points project is investigating, and why.