The Challenge

Sustainable Seas

Our objective is to enhance utilisation of our marine resources within environmental and biological constraints. 

Our mission is

“To transform Aotearoa New Zealand’s ability to enhance our marine economy, and to improve decision-making and the health of our seas through ecosystem-based management.”

Our strategy 2019-2024

In June 2019 we released the Challenge’s core research project portfolio for Phase II (2019-2024). This builds on our research strategy for Phase II.

View our Phase II Research – timetable to find out more.  

Background

The Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge was established in 2014.  It is one of 11 Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment-funded Challenges aimed at taking a more strategic approach to science investment.

Funding for National Science Challenges was allocated for ten years in two five-year periods.

Phase 1 will complete on 30 June 2019. In 2018, after a mid-way review, it was confirmed that the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge will receive $39.8 million for the second five-year research phase from 1 July 2019.

Latest news and updates

Where's our research happening?

We’ve developed an interactive map that shows the locations and key information of all our research projects. The aim is to help connect people with the research happening in their community.

Media statement: Today's marine environment report from MfE and StatsNZ

Julie Hall, Director: "It is deeply concerning that the state of our marine environment has not improved in the last three years. Resilient coasts and oceans are essential to New Zealanders' health and wealth, so urgent action is needed to address the decline. There is a growing need for ecosystem-based management (EBM) to holistically manage risk and sustain Aotearoa's coasts and oceans. This is even more important given the ongoing impacts of climate change."

Job opportunity: Communications advisor

Do you have science communication skills and at least 2 years experience? Do you care about Aotearoa's oceans and how people use/value our seas? Then we've got a job for you.

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