Tūhonohono: tikanga Māori me te Ture Pākehā ki Takutai Moana

Law book sitting on kete harakeke with a paua shell

We are investigating how mātauranga and tikanga Māori and New Zealand law can be applied in the marine estate. 

Project leader: Robert Joseph, University of Waikato

Duration: November 2016 – November 2018 
Budet: $195,000 
Status: Ongoing 

The relationship between mātauranga and tikanga Māori, and New Zealand law, and how they apply to Aotearoa New Zealand’s marine estate is complex.  

Tūhonohono is a cohesive vision of New Zealand jurisprudence the theory and philosophy of law relating to marine estate. We are exploring how laws and institutions in Aotearoa New Zealand could evolve to reflect the best values and concepts of New Zealand’s founding peoples – Māori and European. 

We are: 

  • Assessing the compatibility of marine policy and law with the mātauranga and tikanga Māori of specific iwi, hapū and whānau within Te Tau Ihu o Te Waka-a-Māui/Top of the South Island. 
  • Investigating how mātauranga and tikanga Māori are applied in the marine environment. 
  • Exploring what the enablers and/or barriers in New Zealand marine policy and law are when applying mātauranga and tikanga Māori, and what effect this has when making decisions about increased use of marine resources. 
  • Exploring how legal and regulatory systems could be modified to enable them to work more cohesively with mātauranga and tikanga Māori, to achieve kaitiakitanga and ecosystem-based management outcomes specific to Māori. 
  • Building on international indigenous examples that have successfully applied indigenous customary law and mainstream law to marine environments. 
  • Exploring innovative marine management models that implement cohesive jurisprudence and reflect the best values and concepts of both founding peoples. 

Latest news and updates

Interview: Stew Robertson, Abel Tasman Ecotours/Tasman Bay Guardians

Stew Robertson has been a participant in research workshops for projects focused in Tasman-Golden Bay. He is involved with the Nelson Biodiversity Forum and founded the Tasman Bay Guardians in 2017.

Understanding food webs to help manage coastal resources

A study of coastal food webs has revealed how ecosystem-based approaches to marine management could improve management of fish stocks and biodiversity in our changing coastal ocean.

Sharing our latest sedimentation science

In a workshop hosted in Wellington in early May, NIWA and Victoria University of Wellington researchers shared their latest findings on the effects of sediment on both shallow water and deep-sea species with iwi and stakeholders.