Tāhuhu Matatau Te Ao Tangaroa: Empowering the kaitiaki of Ngā Whare Tokotoru ki Katikati with mātauranga from Aotearoa and beyond

Connecting kaitiaki. © Regan Fairlie, Manaaki Te Awanui

We are collaborating with Māori communities to review scientific information that may support the expression of kaitiakitanga and other kaupapa tuku iho linked with the domain of Tangaroa. 

Project leader: Caine Taiapa, Manaaki Te Awanui

Duration: July 2017 – June 2019 
Budget: $290,000 
Status: Ongoing 

We are seeking to identify key Western scientific developments in areas like marine ecology, spatial planning, real-time monitoring and aquaculture that can be used to support (i) the work of our frontline kaitiaki and (ii) the future development of the Māori marine economy.  

For this project, we are using a newly-developed model of hapū engagement to tailor and develop information we gather into forms that best suit our frontline kaitiaki. This includes developing an online Pataka Mātauranga (digital resource) that frontline kaitiaki and Māori communities can use to support their educational, research, future co-management/co-governance, and planning activities in the domain of Tangaroa. 

We envisage that this Pataka Mātauranga will be customised to differing hapū contexts and will provide a step-by-step approach to exploring emerging knowledge developments in the marine space. We also want to ensure that the presentation of Western scientific knowledge, frameworks, data and tools provides a seamless and intuitive bridge to the language and concepts that our frontline kaitiaki and Māori communities are familiar with.   

Progress to date has been guided by participating hapū and kaitiaki of the Tauranga Moana and includes:  

  • Creation of a prototype, web-based digital resource centre 
  • Collection and preparation of digital resources (videos, reports, websites, spatial layers and published papers) 
  • Creation of graphical user interface and framework for the managing metadata. 

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