New blue economy in Kaikōura: a participatory process approach

Kaikōura coastline. © Dave Allen, NIWA

This project aims to help the Kaikōura community and businesses build a sustainable blue economy as they recover from the 2016 earthquakes. 

Project leader: Nick Lewis, University of Auckland

Duration: February 2018 – June 2019 
Budget: $110,000 
Status: Ongoing 
 

Following the November 2016 earthquakes, Kaikōura’s economy is being redeveloped amid huge disruption to marine ecology and everyday social and economic life.  

Our project is working with Kaikōura’s communities and businesses to develop a practical, long-term ’value proposition’ for a sustainable blue economy. We are exploring opportunities that complement other efforts to rebuild the region’s economy and balance social, economic and environmental aspirations 

In interviews with members of the Kaikōura community, we found strong support for developing a blue economy and well-supported community organisations empowered to action their vision. Kaikōura has prominent blue economy champions, strong iwi-Council-business linkages, and is in the process of building a platform for a successful blue economy.  

Challenges for the Kaikōura community will come from attracting investors, channelling growth to meet community aspirations, and managing the tensions between a sustainable blue economy and a growth-centred model based on quantity not quality. 

Book chapter:  

  • Lewis, N. Cultivating diverse values by rethinking blue economy in New Zealand (2018) In Morrisey, J. and Heidkamp, P. (editors) Coastal Transitions: Towards sustainability and resilience in the coastal zone. Routledge. 

  

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